3.24.14 When the Garden Started

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When the Garden Started

For me, I think it started with the free seeds
end of school
fourth grade,
and a few weeks later
radishes
then lettuce
then peas.

Or maybe it was the smell
of the sweet peas Gramp planted
outside Gram’s bedroom window
when I was six.

Or something good to eat.

— Russell Libby

Spring Equinox has arrived, yet the ground has barely begun to yield to the sun’s lengthening warmth. It remains inhospitable to planting directly, and those vegetables that need the extra time are given a head start indoors. There’s a kind of intimacy in starting something from seed, and it’s hard to believe how these tiny bundles of energy will transform themselves into their more mature and recognizable state, and turning into something good to eat. Above: Seed from John’s Pomodorini Piennolo saved from last season, as when we started, simply dried on paper.

3.24.14 When the Garden Started

Above: Brilliant Celeriac seeds from Fedco.

3.24.14 When the Garden Started

Above: Rossa Lunga di Tropea Onion seeds from Fedco.

3.24.14 When the Garden Started

Above: Pingtung Long Eggplant seeds from Fedco.

3.24.14 When the Garden Started

Above: Orion Fennel seeds from High Mowing.

3.24.14 When the Garden Started

Above: Bandit Leek seeds from High Mowing.

3.24.14 When the Garden Started

Above: French Marigold seeds from Botanical Interests.

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5 Responses to 3.24.14 When the Garden Started

  1. I know nothing about planting, I’m trying to plant coriander because I can’t find fresh coriander here in Sicily. Would you know when it’s a good time to plant the seeds, do I need to water them often?

    • We grow coriander outdoors in big pots during the growing season, and indoors during winter. I’d imagine you’d be able to grow them year-round in Sicily, preferring a cool spot with plenty of moisture. The tricky part is to keep it from bolting, though the flowers are themselves edible and will then produce coriander seed. Worth trying in any case!

  2. cheri says:

    What a beautiful post. Seeds are so interesting.

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