Marina di Chioggia

I can never resist Marina di Chioggia, an Italian beauty. This heirloom, also known as Chioggia Sea Pumpkin, hails from an Adriatic port by the same name, thriving in the salt air and sandy soil found there.

This maxima squash starts out verdigris green, and has a distinctive turban shape. The white striping and lack of bumps on the bottom leads me to believe this one might not be true.

Opening up any maxima can be a daunting, but armed with a cleaver and a mallet, we’re up for the challenge.

A good keeper, the flavor improves with storage. The sweet dry flesh is known to be excellent for soups and pastas. We’ve heard that it’s sold as a street snack in Venice, grilled up as wedges.

Baked at 375°F for an hour, it yielded up its tender, smooth flesh to be turned into pumpkin soup, gnocchi and ravioli.

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8 Responses to Marina di Chioggia

  1. becky3086 says:

    I like the look of them but one thing I have learned about me and squash is that I want one that doesn’t have too many ridges so that I can peel them. I haven’t tried one baked yet.

    • leduesorelle says:

      Be not afraid of the bumps! Baking makes it easy to just scoop out the flesh, far easier than peeling.

  2. Oh I’m so envious of you having a Marina di Chioggia. It’s one I want to try but the nearest I get to it is a Turk’s Turban. Do enjoy it!!

    • leduesorelle says:

      They’re not easy to find but among my favorites, though this one looks like it might have cross-pollinated with a Turk’s Turban!

  3. Norma Chang says:

    That is such a pretty color. Baking then scooping out the flesh is a great idea and less waste I imagine.

    • leduesorelle says:

      I really shouldn’t be buying such large squash, but they are so beautiful it makes them irresistible!

  4. Liz says:

    That looks brilliant – I’m going to have to seek it out, especially if the flavour improves with storage – I seem to keep growing varieties where the reverse is true.

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